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Understanding Youth and Crime (Crime and Justice)

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Published by Open University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Crime & criminology,
  • Social Science,
  • Legal Reference / Law Profession,
  • Sociology,
  • Criminal Law - General,
  • Law / Criminal Law,
  • Criminology,
  • Crime,
  • Dâelinquance juvâenile,
  • Grande-Bretagne,
  • Great Britain,
  • Juvenile delinquency,
  • Sociological aspects

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages272
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10562035M
ISBN 100335216781
ISBN 109780335216789

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It provides a critical introduction to the study of youth, crime and punishment within the context of a social construction of 'youth' which is continually defined as outside of society. Key features include an overview of the field, an examination of developments in policy and practice, and an assessment of 'new' trends in research and theory. Book Description Open University Press 8/1/, Paperback or Softback. Condition: New. Understanding Youth and Crime: Listening to Youth. Book. Seller Inventory # BBS More information about this seller | Contact this seller/5(5). Professor Peter Grabosky,The Australian National University, Australia ’This book offers a first-rate collection of scholary papers drawing from a comprehensive  Australian research program exploring young people and their involvement in crime. It is an essential reader for youth workers, scholars, and policy makers interested in. This book is an accessible introduction to the subject of youth and crime. The author explores the social construction of childhood and youth, and looks at the role of the media in creating a strong association of young people with crime and disorder, which sustains processes of marginalization and exclusion and leads to frequent 'panics' about.

Youth has been a focus of the sociologies of deviance, popular culture, and criminology. The text reassesses the growing body of writing and research about crime and young people. It provides a critical introduction to the study of youth, crime and punishment of the social construction of youth, crime and punishment, an examination of developments in policy and practice since the s and an. Book Review: Understanding Youth Crime: An Australian Study Show all authors. Katherine S. Williams. Katherine S. Williams. University of Wales Aberystwyth See all articles by this author. Search Google Scholar for this author. First Published December 1, Review Article.   Buy Understanding Youth And Crime: Listening to Youth? (Crime & Justice) 2 by Brown, Sheila (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(3). This book is an accessible introduction to the subject of youth and crime. The author explores the social construction of childhood and youth, and looks at the role of the media in creating a strong association of young people with crime and disorder, which sustains processes of marginalization and exclusion and leads to frequent panics about youth crime.

Title: Read Book \ Understanding Youth and Crime: Listening to Youth? (2nd Revised edition) > FYS0IIDRRX7O Created Date: Z.   Understanding Youth and Crime book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Youth has been a focus of the sociologies of deviance, popul /5. Understanding and preventing youth crime Downloads He concludes that the most effective strategies will be those based on a rigorous assessment of local risk and which look at promoting pro-social behaviour and healthy development as well as preventing drug misuse and crime.   Rising youth crime statistics since the s are the result of a whole series of factors and do not mean that youth are becoming more “immoral”. 3. Our treatment of young offenders is in many ways harsher than it has been in the past. This has not been successful in reducing our fear of crime; if anything, it is compounding the problem and.